Brian Feinblum’s Interview with Mira Prabhu

e86345da08c09d1879f0e7eda3a5e911What inspired you to write your book?

Krishna’s Counsel is the second of a trilogy of novels whose theme is moksha(Sanskrit word for ‘liberation from suffering’). (Please see here). My first novel, Whip of the Wild God: A Novel of Tantra in Ancient India, is set in a civilization reminiscent of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization, and my third, Copper Moon Over Pataliputra, is set in 300 BCE. I intended to stick with historical/mystical fiction, but way back in 1999, my Manhattan-based literary agent suggested I write a contemporary novel about an Indian woman who had moved from East to West. Nothing happened until many years later when I found myself marooned in a guest house in Rishikesh in northern India: a wild festival raged all around me, keeping me captive in my suite, and so I decided to sink my teeth into something that would engage my monkey mind; in six months, I had written the first draft of Krishna’s Counsel. Continue reading
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20 Questions with Mira Prabhu

Don Massenzio’s interview with yours truly…

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Today we sit down with fascinating author Mira Prabhu. She is joining us to tell us about her work, her inspiration and a bit about herself. Please enjoy this edition of 20 Questions: Q1) When did …

Read more here: 20 Questions with Mira Prabhu

Melissa Bowersock’s Author Interview: Mira Prabhu

Today I’m sitting down with Mira Prabhu to talk about her new book, Krishna’s Counsel. The book is a modern epic of a girl growing up in South India during the 1960s, and it brings together a very unlikely but fitting combination of ancient Indian wisdom, the 60’s drug culture and the recovery steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. Additionally, it is currently enrolled in the Kindle Scout Program and could be chosen for an Amazon publishing contract. Part of the process involves nominations by readers (like you!), and if the book is chosen by Amazon, everyone who nominates it will receive a FREE e-Book copy. To read the first chapter and nominate the book, go here. This Kindle Scout program ends August 15, 2016. Continue reading

Smorgasbord Open House – Author Mira Prabhu

Sally Cronin never ceases to amaze me with her enthusiastic willingness to spread the work of other writers – this despite being busily creative herself and a hectic social life. Here’s her interview with yours truly…

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

smorgasbord open house two

My guest today, author Mira Prabhu, was born in Bangalore which a cosmopolitan city located in the south of India. In recent years there has been an influx of hi-tech companies which has changed the face of what was once called the Garden City. Mira is author of The Moksha Trilogy which we will find out about later in the interview.

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Here is an excerpt from an interview that I did with Mira back in 2014

My British-educated parents were extremely conservative and enforced a strict gender double-standard I grew up resenting: We girls were groomed for the marriage market and expected to be pretty, docile creatures who kowtowed to the patriarchy. It didn’t take me long to realize I wanted nothing to do with this scenario.

Fortunately my parents insisted that both sons and daughters be highly educated. My father even ordered us to speak English at home…

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Meet Guest Author Mira Prabhu

Many thanks to you, Chris Graham, for offering to host this interview on your intriguingly-named site – and for being your generous, multi-tasking, and witty self.

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

wwgWhip the Wild God…how it all began. It’s the Manhattan winter of 1992 and I’ve just walked out on my mate of fourteen years with nothing in my pocket. Where does this constant low-grade terror I feel spring from, I wonder bleakly? I trace it to an insidious notion that I lack the guts and fierce will needed to survive alone in this frenetic city—where those who don’t make the grade drown in the gutters of low-self-esteem and increasing emotional and financial penury.

What the hell is wrong with me? The western women I’ve come to know through freelancing at Manhattan’s upscale financial and law firms impress me with their confident risk-taking and street smarts. Why am I such a coward? Perhaps it’s because I was born into a traditional Indian community known to punish, even ostracize, females who dare to be bold, unique, autonomous. Most girls of my generation…

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The Author Hot Seat with Mira Prabhu

The Author Hot Seat with Mira Prabhu!

Via Jane Dougherty, who delights her own readers by writing about fantastical places and other stuff…

Jane Dougherty Writes

My third guest author this week is Mira Prabhu whose writing is as vibrant and colourful as her subject matter, the glittering mythology of the Indian subcontinent.

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J: Tell us what the story/your work is about, the setting, the background, and where it takes the reader.

M: Whip the Wild God…the fecund seed of this novel was sown in my consciousness in the Manhattan winter of 1992, not long after I had summoned up the guts to walk out on my mate of fourteen years. Fear was my constant companion during those days—for unlike the savvy American and European women friends I had come to admire through my freelance work on Wall Street and Manhattan law firms, I had been born into a conservative Indian community where these same traits, so valued in the liberal streets of New York, had been severely frowned upon in me.

I had moved metaphorical…

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Marie Lavender: Interview with Author Mira Prabhu

Interview with Author Mira Prabhu

My guest today is Mira Prabhu.  Hello, Mira!  Welcome to Writing in the Modern Age!  It’s such a pleasure to have you.

whip of the wild godIs there anything that prompted your book ? Something that inspired you? 

I grew up in an unusually westernized community in south India. Bizarrely enough, I only began to investigate my ethic origins after I got to Manhattan in my mid-twenties. Eastern philosophy, particularly the ancient teachings on tantra—which transliterates roughly as ‘the explosion of consciousness’—fascinated me. It saddened me that the original purity of tantra seemed to have vanished; both in India and in the west, tantra was generally equated with unbridled hedonism. And yet I was learning that a genuine tantric/tantrika cultivates a strong ethical and philosophical foundation—without which one is not permitted to take a mate; the process of laying a proper foundation can take decades.

Continue reading…