About Mira Prabhu

I was born in India and moved to New York in my mid-twenties. It was during my tumultuous residence in Manhattan that I first became fascinated by eastern philosophy’s power to transform the genuine seeker.So, during the freezing winter of 1993, I began to write Whip of the Wild God, a novel of tantra set in an ancient civilization reminiscent of India’s famous Indus Valley Civilization. I completed this novel–believe it or not!–twenty years later, in the shadow of Arunachala, the ancient hill considered by millions to be the God Shiva incarnate. Three more novels are currently simmering in my consciousness–Copper Moon Over Pataliputra, set in the time of the magnificent Mauryan Empire (300 BCE, India); Krishna’s Counsel, a contemporary novel (the genre: metaphysical crime fiction!), set both in India and New York, and a third, untitled, in which I intend to present the spiritual “view” necessary for seeking moksha, or enlightenment–a unique and perhaps controversial view I have garnered from my travels and study all across the globe–from south India to Manhattan, to the foothills of the Himalayas, Europe, and finally back to south India. I now live in the deep south of India, hanging out with my divine canines, Kali and Aghori, delighting in my growing garden, and continuing to mine my own creative and spiritual potential.

Researchers Reveal 5 Secrets of People Who Have Lived to Be 100 by Power of Positivity

I hope you read this – mystics claim that it is very difficult to attain human birth – our lives are beyond precious!!!

SeventhRay 2035


While centenarians make up a small share of the world’s older population, their proportion is growing. In 1990 there were 2.9 centenarians for every 10,000 adults ages 65 and older around the world. That share grew to 7.4 by 2015 and is projected to rise by 23.6 by 2050. ~ Pew Research

Japan and Italy, what’s your secret?

All you can eat sushi and pasta? (“Please God…”)

On a serious note, the Japanese and Italians dust the rest of the world in the proportionate number of persons aged 100 and older.

Japan has the top spot at 4.8 per 10,000 people, followed by Italy at 4.1 per 10,000.

The U.S. ranks third at 2.2. China (0.3) and India (0.2) round out the top five.

What’s truly incredible is that these numbers are expected to rise as much as ten-fold over the next 35 years, according to the United Nations’ “World…

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…pain, loss, regret – the stuff of drama Harold Pinter QUOTES FOR WRITERS (and people who like quotes)

Drama includes pain, loss, regret – that’s what drama is about!
Harold Pinter

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

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I think plays have nothing to do with one’s own personal life. Not in my experience, anyway. The stuff of drama has to do, not with your subject matter, anyway, but with how you treat it. Drama includes pain, loss, regret – that’s what drama is about!
Harold Pinter

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Is there anything you can’t write about? ART FOR WRITERS

The dispassionate genius of the great artist: “I caught myself…searching for the succession, the arrangement of coloured graduations that death was imposing on her motionless face” Read on!

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

monet-camille-monet-on-her-deathbedI’m guessing that most people have seen Claude Monet’s water lilies in his garden at Giverny, near Paris. He began painting them in 1899 and didn’t stop for the next 20 years. The images he created are on posters and make up bags, tableclothes and lighters. They have caught our collective imagination and their gentle colours have become part of our mental landscape.

This painting, however, comes from an earlier and darker period of his life. It is of Camille Monet and she has just died a slow, painful death from cancer having been ill for two years with tuberculosis.  It is 1879, she is 32 years old and leaves behind two small sons and a grief-stricken husband burdened with terrible financial problems.

And what does he do? He paints her and even as he does so, he’s horrified that he can be so detached.

“I caught myself…searching for the…

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YOUNG SOUL, OLD SOUL

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Kiri 16GB sd card 6243-1The New Age (which I happen to mostly detest and keep my distance for, for really it is all recycled material that they use often to great detriment of depth and richness) has popularized many buzzwords and one is that someone or the other is an old soul. Now when I threw the words “young soul” at a close friend one day in frustration, he blew up at me and said these phrases were ridiculous nonsense. Not so, I said, for to me the difference between an old and a young soul is as clear as the full moon shining over Arunachala on a balmy summer’s night.

An Old Soul is simply a human who has seen through the mesmerizing veils of Maya, the Cosmic Enchantress. He or she has either experienced the double-edged sword of samsara in this lifetime, or his knowing has emerged from countless past lives. Never mind, but this person is no longer enchanted by stately mansions surrounded by a forest of palm trees, obscenely plump bank accounts or stock portfolios, expensive vehicles, supermodels, celebrities of all kinds, or by those pampered creatures with access to the so-called good life. Why is this? Simply because this person now knows for sure that while there is a great deal of pleasure to be drawn from the world, this pleasure is invariably followed by pain, which is why the mystics refer to indulgence in a hedonistic lifestyle as licking the honey off a razor’s edge. And what about the Young Soul? Oh, he or she is still dazzled by the façade, that’s all.

c945ed890f540a675b775ccb608893f3Now for the critical question: is one better than the other? My honest answer is, while I would prefer to be an Old Soul, the essence of both is exactly the same—pure existence, awareness and bliss. Would you turn back as you ascend an infinite stairway and have contempt for those who have just begun their journey of comprehending reality? Not if you were wise and loving, for sure. An Old Soul was once a  Young Soul and a Young Soul will inevitably evolve into an Old Soul, but, and it’s a big but, this depends on consistent effort. Liberation is guaranteed to all of us, but no one is saying when. So its up to us to prolong the suffering or not.

Greetings from Arunachala, Shiva in the form of a hill of fire and light, who vows to open our inner eye so we can discriminate between the real and the unreal, between true joy and the fake pleasure that comes from the reckless enjoyment of the senses!

NEW!!! My latest book – COPPER MOON OVER PATALIPUTRA – just went live on Jun 30th. Read all about it and on how to get your own copy here.
If you’ve enjoyed reading my posts, please also check out my BOOKS and LINKS.

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New Book: Ramana’s “Forty Verses on Reality” with comments

An incredible gift to the sincere seeker of permanent freedom from suffering….

Living in the Embrace of Arunachala

Ramana Maharshi details his entire teaching in his Forty Verses on Reality. The best way to read this book is by deeply meditating on each verse. Comments and Practice notes are added to each verse, to help the reader to understand just what is meant, and to assist the meditation and Self-inquiry needed to folly know what Ramana Maharshi was teaching.

Click this link to download:  40 Verses or Reality with comments

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“…A story is how we construct our experiences…” Doris Lessing QUOTES FOR WRITERS (and people who like quotes)

“…that is the template of our stories – a beginning, middle, and end.” Yes!!!

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

man-2933984_640Humanity’s legacy of stories and storytelling is the most precious we have. All wisdom is in our stories and songs. A story is how we construct our experiences. At the very simplest, it can be: ‘He/she was born, lived, died.’ Probably that is the template of our stories – a beginning, middle, and end.
Doris Lessing.

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Secret of Happiness

Be the light. That light will illumine your path and that of others and will be the best help you can give. Thanks for this, Harsh!

Luthar.com

What is the secret of happiness?

Don’t bother anyone.

Don’t be bothered by anyone.

That is the path of joy and freedom.

Help those who come your way. Help where needed.

But don’t bother anyone. Don’t impose yourself and your views on others.

Stay with people and be part of the community devoted to universal love and peace.

Stay away from those who like to argue. Let them find their way.

Sri Ramana used to say that the best help we can give others is to transform ourself.

Be a person of peace and compassion, and this will reflect in your actions.

Be the light. That light will illumine your path and that of others and will be the best help you can give.

Quietly shine in your own pure nature of peace and radiance.

You will have done all you can.

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Free style interpretation of Ashthavakra Gita verses 3.9 to 3.14

“Freedom from duality comes from Self-Knowledge
and reveals the joy that takes one beyond all sorrows.” Read on and thanks for sharing this, Harsh!

Luthar.com

Whether honored or tormented, in laughter or tears
the wise man, who is aware of his Self-Nature
does not see the body and mind as his own
and releases them to their natural ways.
Freedom from duality comes from Self-Knowledge
and reveals the joy that takes one beyond all sorrows.

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Here are the original verses from the Asthavakra Gita 3.9-3.14

Whether feted or tormented, the wise man is always aware of his supreme self-nature and is neither pleased nor disappointed. 3.9

The great-souled person sees even his own body in action as if it were someone else’s, so how should he be disturbed by praise or blame? 3.10

Seeing this world as pure illusion, and devoid of any interest in it, how should the strong-minded person feel fear, even at the approach of death? 3.11

Who can be compared to the great-souled person whose mind is free from desire…

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EVERYONE HAS A HIGHER POWER

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c54413c0d2a06f18743e8ad014a31eaeManhattan broke down my identity; in south India I was more or less confident that I could accomplish anything I set my mind on. I was popular, well-known in certain circles, and could have launched myself into a lucrative creative career had I wished to. Instead I suffered a deep dread of never leaving home and so I finagled my exit to a foreign country that I admired for many reasons. Yes, I loathed the deep-rooted misogyny, caste and class system I was surrounded by and longed for the freedom I hoped to find in America. But I was unprepared for the shocks to my system in the land of the brave and the free. Indeed, nothing was as I had expected it to be and I had to literally reinvent myself, alone, since my husband and in-laws were no help, and instead actively wanted to shove me into a box, lock me up, and throw away the key. You see, they had not expected an Indian woman to be feisty, independent and outspoken about her rights, and so they lashed out in me in a variety of inventive ways until I was deeply miserable despite abundant material comforts. My husband had promised that I could study creative writing and film at NYU, but now he ruthlessly nixed that idea and I found myself temping on Wall Street and in posh law firms, making a lot of money but still a prisoner of my new family and my husband in particular, who insisted on controlling our finances as well as the trajectory of our lives. Continue reading

“Why do men feel threatened by women?” asked Margaret Atwood QUOTES FOR WRITERS and everyone

Ah ha, big question that I have grappled with for years….thanks, Bridget Whelan.

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

community-150124_640Given the events over the last few weeks , I thought it would be a good idea to post the words of Margret Atwood:

Why do men feel threatened by women?” I asked a male friend of mine. So this male friend of mine, who does by the way exist, conveniently entered into the following dialogue.
“I mean,” I said, “men are bigger, most of the time, they can run faster, strangle better, and they have on the average a lot more money and power.”
“They’re afraid women will laugh at them,” he said. “Undercut their world view.”

Then I asked some women students in a quickie poetry seminar I was giving, “Why do women feel threatened by men?”
“They’re afraid of being killed,” they said.

She’s nailed it, right?

•Atwood, Margaret, Writing the Male Character (1982) (reprinted in Second Words: Selected Critical Prose from a Hagey Lecture on February…

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