About Mira Prabhu

I was born in India and moved to New York in my mid-twenties. It was during my tumultuous residence in Manhattan that I first became fascinated by eastern philosophy’s power to transform the genuine seeker.So, during the freezing winter of 1993, I began to write Whip of the Wild God, a novel of tantra set in an ancient civilization reminiscent of India’s famous Indus Valley Civilization. I completed this novel–believe it or not!–twenty years later, in the shadow of Arunachala, the ancient hill considered by millions to be the God Shiva incarnate. Three more novels are currently simmering in my consciousness–Copper Moon Over Pataliputra, set in the time of the magnificent Mauryan Empire (300 BCE, India); Krishna’s Counsel, a contemporary novel (the genre: metaphysical crime fiction!), set both in India and New York, and a third, untitled, in which I intend to present the spiritual “view” necessary for seeking moksha, or enlightenment–a unique and perhaps controversial view I have garnered from my travels and study all across the globe–from south India to Manhattan, to the foothills of the Himalayas, Europe, and finally back to south India. I now live in the deep south of India, hanging out with my divine canines, Kali and Aghori, delighting in my growing garden, and continuing to mine my own creative and spiritual potential.

What storytellers can do – Erin Morgenstern QUOTES FOR WRITERS (and people who like quotes)

Write a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, ah, a worthy objective. Thank you, Bridget Whelan.

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

alice-in-wonderland-30130_640You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone’s soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. That is your role, your gift.
Erin Morgenstern

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An Open Letter to Rev. Franklin Graham from a “Small Church” Pastor

I admire this “small town pastor” – he is my idea of a true man of god: “I am struggling, too, with your claim that Donald Trump is a champion (albeit an unlikely one) for religious freedom. What freedoms are we talking about here, Frank? The freedom to lie with impunity? The freedom to grab young girls by the genitals? The freedom to discriminate against people of color in the sale and rental of real estate? The freedom to refer to women as “dogs,” “fat pigs,” and “ugly”? The freedom to call your opponents “idiots,” “losers,” “liars” and “frauds”? The freedom to slander people with accusations of criminal conduct based on absolutely no evidence? By my count, the above violate at least four of the Ten Commandments (you will find those in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy-both in the Bible). If Donald Trump is the champion of American Christianity, God save it from its enemies!”

Trinity's Portico

Dear Frank

Can I call you Frank? This is just pastor to pastor. Feel free to call me Peter. Anyway, I have to say I was flattered when I learned that your Decision America Tour took a detour off the beaten path to call upon us “small community churches.” We are nothing if not small. We seat 30-40 on a good Sunday. And we are a century old fixture of our small community. Most often we are overlooked and overshadowed by mega-churches and politically influential religious voices like your own. We don’t hold a candle to an auditorium filled with the music of a one hundred voice choir led by professional musicians. We probably will never be recognized in any nationally syndicated media. After all, we don’t do anything really “newsworthy.” We just preach the good news of Jesus Christ; love one another the best we can (which sometimes isn’t…

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Some times you tell a story through the things you leave out…ART FOR WRITERS

“History books can tell us what happened at the storming of the Bastille or the court of Queen Elizabeth, but only fiction can tell us what it felt like to be there. And leaving things out may be a way of capturing the emotional life of the past. ” Thanks, Bridget Whelan!

BRIDGET WHELAN writer

Race you to the bottom Leigh Lambert

This painting is called Race You to the Bottom and was created sometime in the late 1990s I imagine, or even more recently, because the artist was born in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne in 1979.  I’ve read that Leigh Lambert’s primary inspiration is his own memories of growing up in North East England, but he draws on things other than memory for a painting like this. Conciously or not, he must have been influenced by earlier generations of artists who depicted working class life. And even by William Blake’s  dark, satanic mills because surely clean air legislation would have shut down those smoke-gushing stacks by the time Leigh was playing in the streets. I sincerely hope so.

But the reason I feel certain that the artist didn’t rely on memory alone is the things he didn’t paint. There are no cars, moving or parked, no street furniture or signage, no markings on the…

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Why Playing It Safe Is Riskier than You Think

How high are you willing to fly? Even the sky is not the limit – in my case, its flying into the burning core of the Spiritual Heart…. thanks, Josiah Harry!

SKYLARITY

Before you delve into the heart of this post, for the next few minutes, I’d like you to reflect on your life and the many times you avoided risks and opted for the path of least resistancethe path that was comfortable and predictable.

Looking back, what did you see?

Here’s what you likely saw. The things that seemed so scary and risky at the time now seem like missed opportunitiesmany of which you can never regain. But that’s the past, which has been etched in history. Let’s look at the present through the lenses of the next question.

How high are you willing to fly?

For many of you, your natural instinct is to think deeply and weigh every factor very carefully before arriving at a definitive conclusion. Although the question is a fairly simple one, you are hesitant to offer a direct response because at…

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Xylotheque: The Wood Library

Superb idea: “In 18th century Germany, where modern forestry began, a curious sort of library began to grow. Enthusiasts began to collect samples of different woods, but instead of simple blocks the samples were fashioned in the shape of books. These wooden “books” could be opened to reveal a hollowed out compartment where botanical samples of the source tree were stored — leaves, seeds, nut, twigs, fruit, flowers, pieces of root and bark. In some cases, written descriptions of the tree and the diseases it might suffer from were also included. The “books” were arranged in shelves, just like in a regular library, with the spine showing where the labels were attached.” Thanks for sharing, Alk3r!

ALK3R

xylotheque-2A xylotheque at Stift Lilienfeld in Austria. Every “book” is made by the wood of the tree that is documented inside. Photo credit: Haeferl/Wikimedia

In 18th century Germany, where modern forestry began, a curious sort of library began to grow.

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Writing to get RICH

Some people do write to get rich and a few of these “some” even succeed…but I write for different reasons. Writing gives me clarity, strength, patience, it coaxes me to learn more about the subjects I am writing about so I can be fluid and authentic, and it is, to use a Sanskrit word, my “dharma” or sacred mission. Check this post out if you also write…thanks Wallace Peach!

Myths of the Mirror

rich

Well, that was a bait and switch, sort of. It all depends on how one defines rich.

I wonder how many of us start this writing journey with secret dreams of bestsellers, movie deals, roly-poly royalty checks, and hiring efficient staff with clipboards to manage our fan mail.

I write fantasy after all. A little dreaming is in order. Yet, I always knew that dream was a stretch (a gigantic one).

My husband, on the other hand, had high hopes that he’d married Ms. Moneybags who’d drag her sacks of gold from her thousands of books sales down the red carpet to the bank.

Ha ha ha. That would be nice! It didn’t take long for him to become disillusioned, the poor man.

Because that’s not how this author thing works (just in case you’re a dreamer and think it is). Oh yes, some few among us have outstanding good luck and…

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LIVING WITH PARALYSIS

Living with paralysis…unfortunately, and its a bitter pill to swallow, this could happen to any of us – which is why it is so heart-warming and wonderful to know that some heroes do when confronted with a terrible illness – thanks so much for sharing, Tina Frisco!

TINA FRISCO

Casey Sims was in an accident that left him paralyzed. He went through a period of loss and came out the other side with a purpose in life. He started a blog and is now showing us how to overcome adversity and thrive while doing it. He also has a website with a lot of photographs.
Casey is new to blogging and would love to meet fellow bloggers.  Please visit his Blog, follow and share ❤

 

Living with Paralysis

Livin With Paralysis…                                           “The Man Who Thinks He Can, And The Man Who Thinks He Can’t, Are Both Right…”                                                                  …

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A Message from Leslie Robinson,  Founder of Arunachala Animal Sanctuary…

First, a true story for you:  Jansy was a six month old puppy when she was hit by a two wheeler. Poor baby took a hit in the head and was unconscious when brought to us. Dr. Raja didn’t think she was going to make it. She was in a coma for ten days, clinging to life, concussion, potential nerve damage, eyeball hanging out, skull fracture. In intensive care, we stroked her and whispered to her: “Sweet Jansy, hang on, you’re with very good people.” We played chants, gave her I.V.’s for nutrition, spinal injections for controlling brain inflammation, neurobion-vitamins to boost her nervous system, pain killers and Reiki.

Mirculously, a few days later, Jansy started moving her head a little, and then her body. Still later, she turned on her stomach. Then she sat up and started eating a little. She was comfortable with us and clearly felt safe. After 3 ½ weeks she started trying to stand, then taking her first steps. She was indrawn, but content. We let her walk around in isolation a week, encouraging her, stroking and kissing her. Then she was ready for the veranda, to rest on one of the straw mattresses. A lot of puppies were out there, and a lot of snuggling and warming up began. Jansy started responding and even forming some relationships. Walking around, resting, playing gently, going off alone occasionally or just resting—and then, voila, she was bounding around with the rest. Welcome back dear Jansy! We love you!!! Continue reading