The Tragedy of A Relationship

“When a pigeon flies, his wings beat in taal… You can count the matras if you don’t believe me. And such a sweet voice… God has invested such a treasure of music in each of his creations that man can take armfuls away but never exhaust it. Goddess Saraswati has given me a little too. But not as much as I would have liked. Just when I began to draw something from the ocean of music, my time was up. This is the trouble, when the fruit of a man’s lifelong labour ripens… Who can understand God’s ways? But one thing I have understood a little. There is a fruit, the custard apple. I like it very much. I eat it and throw the seeds outside the window. And one day I look and there’s another tree of the same fruit. With new fruits on its branches. I eat it and others enjoy it too. This music also is like that. It is not the property of one, it belongs to so many.”

superaalifragilistic

In August 2000, Ravi Shankar’s first wife, the reclusive surbahar virtuoso Annapurna Devi, did her only interview in 60 years with me in which she spoke about her torturous marriage and the tragic life of their son Shubho. Originally published in Man’s World, it was rediscovered by a journalist in December 2012 after the demise of Pandit Ravi Shankar. Since then, the story of Annapurna Devi has gone viral logging in over 10k Likes on Facebook and 900 shares. It’s an amazing, unforgettable story of a rare modern-day musician mystic.

B_Id_338300_Annapurna_Devi
In the Hindustani classical music fraternity, Annapurna Devi’s genius is part of a growing mythology. The daughter of the great Ustad Allauddin Khan, the sister of Ustad Ali Akbar Khan and the divorced wife of Pandit Ravi Shankar, she is considered to be one of the greatest living exponents of both the surbahar and the sitar.

The tragedy is that…

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4 thoughts on “The Tragedy of A Relationship

  1. I am aware that Ravi Shankar was a philanderer ever since Norah Jones became a popular pop jazz performer. What an interesting family story of unfulfilled talent and ill-fated marriage. To know that Ravi Shankar’s son was a huge talent in his own right is fascinating, and that it was due to his mother’s efforts should be no surprise because his father had his eyes on the prize.There is always a price to pay for fame. It is too bad it affected those around him so profoundly. Thanks for reposting, Mira.

    WordPress.com | Mira Prabhu posted: ““When a pigeon flies, his wings beat in taal… You can count the matras if you don’t believe me. And such a sweet voice… God has invested such a treasure of music in each of his creations that man can take armfuls away but never exhaust it. Goddess Saraswa” | | Respond to this post by replying above this line |

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    | | | | The Tragedy of A Relationship by Mira Prabhu |

    Reblogged from superaalifragilistic: – – In August 2000, Ravi Shankar’s first wife, the reclusive surbahar virtuoso Annapurna Devi, did her only interview in 60 years with me in which she spoke about her torturous marriage and the tragic life of their son Shubho. Originally published in Man’s World, it was rediscovered by a journalist in December 2012 after the demise of Pandit Ravi Shankar. Since then, the story of Annapurna Devi has gone viral logging in over 10k Likes on Facebook and 900 shares.Read more… 5,296 more words“When a pigeon flies, his wings beat in taal… You can count the matras if you don’t believe me. And such a sweet voice… God has invested such a treasure of music in each of his creations that man can take armfuls away but never exhaust it. Goddess Saraswati has given me a little too. But not as much as I would have liked. Just when I began to draw something from the ocean of music, my time was up. This is the trouble, when the fruit of a man’s lifelong labour ripens… Who can understand God’s ways? But one thing I have understood a little. There is a fruit, the custard apple. I like it very much. I eat it and throw the seeds outside the window. And one day I look and there’s another tree of the same fruit. With new fruits on its branches. I eat it and others enjoy it too. This music also is like that. It is not the property of one, it belongs to so many.” Mira Prabhu | March 27, 2017 at 7:31 am | Categories: Reblog | URL: http://wp.me/p3rcfD-2xC | Comment |    See all comments |    Like |

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  2. What a tragic and appalling narrative. There are deep lessons to be learnt here but each one must seek them out individually. Both fame and talent are powerful destructive forces and few, indeed, are those whose lives may be said to be any the better for their possession. Thanks for posting this. It is a sobering account worth deep pondering.

    • Yes, a sobering account. I want to write a book about this someday, particularly about the deep codes that condition Indian men to hurt women. A big subject and I don’t know if I can do it justice, but any effort in this direction is good.

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